Understand Medicare in Wisconsin

Medicare, the United States federal medical insurance program, provides coverage for about 650,000 people in Wisconsin who qualify for Medicare.  You can get Medicare if you’re 65 or older or have a qualifying disability.

Your disability typically qualifies if you’ve received at least 24 Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) disability insurance payments. You can also enroll in Medicare Advantage Plans if you have End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Most people have premium-free Part A but, if you have to buy it, the cost can reach up to $499 per month in 2022. Part B costs $170.10 per month but can be more if you have higher income.  There are 110 Medicare Advantage Plans in the state that are an alternative to Original Medicare.  Learn more about your Medicare options in Wisconsin.

Medicare Plans in Wisconsin

Compare ratings of Wisconsin’s Medicare plan providers:
Insurance company Medicare rating A.M. Best rating BBB rating NCQA rating J.D. Power ranking
Aetna 4 stars A A+ 2.5 to 4.5 stars 5 out of 10
Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield 4 to 4.5 stars A+ A+ Not rated Sixth out of 10
Cigna 4 stars A- Not rated 2.5 to 4.5 stars Seventh out of 10
Humana 4 stars A- A+ 1.5 to 4.5 stars Third out of ten
UnitedHealthcare 3.5 stars A- A- 4 stars Fourth out of 10

Medicare Plan Options in Wisconsin

Residents of Wisconsin have multiple Medicare plans to choose from. Many are tiered to help Wisconsin seniors find the plan that is best suited to their lifestyle and medical needs. For example, seniors and individuals with disabilities who don’t need much coverage can apply for Original Medicare. Wisconsin’s Medicare Advantage program might be a better option if you need more comprehensive insurance. Some Medicare policies offer additional prescription drug add-ons or supplementary coverage.

Original Medicare (Parts A and B) Original Medicare is the basic Medicare plan, which is a fee-for-service form of insurance. It has two parts: Part A hospital insurance and Part B medical insurance. Part A covers hospital stays and periods spent at skilled nursing facilities, lab tests an individual has performed, and hospice care. Part B covers doctor’s office visits and home health care services. It may also cover some preventive care, such as screenings for cancers and mental illnesses, including depression. With Original Medicare, you’ll pay a deductible along with your share of the fees incurred during an inpatient or outpatient visit:
  • Original Medicare is a good choice if you want flexibility in choosing and accessing providers that accept Medicare anywhere in the U.S.
  • There is no cap on what you could spend for out-of-pocket expenses, and you must purchase drug coverage separately, so it’s a better choice for you if you don’t need much in the way of health care or prescription drugs.
  • If you don’t purchase a Medigap policy to supplement Original Medicare when you are first eligible, you may not be able to purchase one or may have to pay higher premiums, depending on your health status.
Medicare Advantage Plans (Part C) Medicare Advantage plans, also known as Part C, are an alternative to Original Medicare offered by private insurance companies. These plans include both Part A and Part B coverage, except for hospice care. Most services are provided by network providers, and you may need primary care physicians, referrals for specialists, and prior authorizations for treatment and medications. Medicare Advantage offers additional coverage for essential needs, such as prescription drugs, dental and vision care. Some Medicare Advantage Plans also cover gym memberships and transportation to and from medical appointments. Part C may also pay for adult day care services:
  • Medicare Advantage is a good choice if you want to have all of your health care and drug benefits bundled together in one plan and if you don’t mind being restricted in your choice of providers to save on costs.
  • There is a cap on what you can spend for out-of-pocket Medicare-covered expenses.
  • You also have access to services that Medicare doesn’t cover, like routine dental and vision exams.
Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage Plans (Part D) Many Medicare Advantage policies add Part D drug coverage automatically to their package, but you can also add Medicare prescription drug coverage to Original Medicare. Medicare prescription drug coverage is offered to all Medicare enrollees, but you may have to pay a penalty if you wait to enroll after being initially eligible. Medicare Part D plans may not all cover the same drugs or have the same costs as Medicare Advantage policies. Standalone Part D coverage is provided by Medicare-approved private insurers. Most plans require a deductible and a copay for each prescription drug:
  • Part D is a good choice if you have Original Medicare, or if you have a Medicare Advantage Plan ― not a health maintenance organization (HMO) or preferred provider organization (PPO) ― that doesn’t have prescription drug coverage.
  • You pay a penalty if you wait to enroll in a Part D plan, unless you have creditable coverage from an employer-sponsored group plan.
  • If you don’t require medications now, you can enroll in a low-premium Part D plan to avoid late enrollment penalties later.
Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans (Medigap) Some Wisconsin seniors purchase a Medicare Supplement Insurance policy, also known as Medigap. These plans are intended to fill in the gaps Original Medicare doesn’t cover. Some of these gaps include medical coverage while overseas, Part A and Part B copays, and excess Part B charges. Medigap doesn’t pay for anything related to Medicare Advantage. You cannot have a Medigap plan and a Medicare Advantage Plan at the same time.
  • Medigap is a good choice if you have Original Medicare and want help paying for out-of-pocket expenses you incur when you access your Part A and Part B benefits.
  • You pay a monthly premium, and most copays and coinsurance costs are covered.
  • If you have significant health care needs, want the freedom to see any Medicare provider without network restrictions, a Medigap plan offers predictable coverage and costs for Medicare-covered care.
  • Medigap doesn’t cover prescription drugs or other benefits like dental and vision.

Medicare in Wisconsin by the Numbers

People enrolled in Original Medicare  Average plan cost Annual state spending per beneficiary Spending per beneficiary compared to the national average
644,242 Plan A: $0 to $499 per month*

Plan B: $170.10 per month**

$8,763 -13.00%

*Most people pay no premium, but this can vary depending on how long they paid Medicare taxes.
**This is the average number, but it can vary based on income.

Medicare Resources in Wisconsin

Getting the facts about how Medicare works is important. When they have questions, older adults and their caregivers can consult with a variety of Wisconsin organizations that can help guide them or put them in touch with the appropriate resource. Other good resources include the state’s Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) and local public health agencies, along with nonprofit groups that offer services and programs for seniors.

Wisconsin Department of Health Services

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services offers a listing of Programs and Services for Older Adults. Among those included are Aging and Disability resources, Area Agencies of Aging , and Family Caregiving Support.

Contact information: Website | (608) 266-1865

Wisconsin Aging Advocacy Network

The Wisconsin Aging Advocacy Network is a joint effort between individuals and associations working together to make policy improvements to benefit senior residents.

Contact information: Website | (715) 677-6723

Kelly-Blackwell Headshot
Certified Senior Advisor (CSA)®

As a health care professional since 1987, Kelly Blackwell has walked alongside and cared for seniors as they journey through the season of their fourth quarter of life. Blackwell holds a Bachelor of Science in nursing from the University of Northern Colorado, a Master of Science in health care administration from Grand Canyon University, an interprofessional graduate certificate in palliative care from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and holds a Certified Senior Advisor® credential from the Society of Certified Senior Advisors.

Blackwell contributes to the University of Colorado-Anschutz blog and has been published in “The Human Touch” distributed by the University of Colorado Center for Bioethics and Humanities. She cowrote “Dying Is” for Pathways Hospice.

A registered nurse, Blackwell understands health insurance choices influence quality of life and are driven by values, goals, and beliefs. She’s passionate about engaging with, educating, and empowering seniors as they navigate the health care system. She’s equipped to lend an experienced, compassionate voice to beneficiaries seeking information about Medicare Advantage Plans.

As a CSA®, Blackwell has access to valuable resources for Medicare beneficiaries. Her work as a bedside nurse and clinical manager has given her the opportunity to see how Medicare rules, regulations, and benefits work when patients need them. With a passion to learn and to make a difference in the lives of seniors, Blackwell supports seniors through Medicare and fourth-quarter life decisions.

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